Tag Archives: work baby

Notes from the Digital Underground

Websites are wearisome. Wonders to create and even harder to maintain.

Initially, they take a ton of time and money. 2,000 pounds. Real money and real time straight from the bank account and straight from the sleep account. But also to be considered, heavily, is the loss of opportunity and ability to focus energies and assets in other areas such as sales, marketing, finance and development due to the necessary attention and capital needed in pushing the process forward. That opportunity cost is gigantic short term. Especially when you are trying to follow the NCAA tournament.

The Agony of Defeat

Some advise to update the frame and function of a website over the  holidays or during the summer when things slow down. The idea being you don’t take holidays or slow down during the summer. This includes such things as Christmas and Mardi Gras. Good luck!

Could be either

And that is just to build the ship, wait for the water to get warm. Then you have to sail. It doesn’t have brakes. It never stops. And the further you want to go, the further you set your sights, the more work it entails each and every day at sea. You can’t bite off more then you can chew.

More 80's

The maintenance cost in time is in direct correlation with the complexity of the site’s design. Keep this in mind when your brain is going on creative fantasies.  We are on our 4th version of the site in less than 2 years. Take small bites but don’t stop eating.

Terrible

The other frightening inevitably of the process is that as soon as you think you have  “it” where you want “it” to be, the world moves forward, and so must your digital presence. Even when you are on time you are late. And like so many facets of business, what doesn’t grow, dies. To keep up in today’s world, a company must demonstrate a constant continuation of growth not only in aesthetic design but functionality and purpose online. If you don’t get a little better you get much worse.  This means that sometimes you have to make the unfortunate decision to begin again despite the sense of satisfaction with something that, on the surface, may seem “finished” or “sufficient.”

We would like to thank Geoff Oliver of Plan8 Studios for his continued work and support, as well as Maggie Sage of M. Sage Design for all of her creative energy.

In addition, we would also like to thank Netta Ruth for her work and Blake Bertuccelli for his consultation.

 

Happy Tuesday,

Anthony